Tunica #6 Editorial
Creative Direction for an editorial in the 6th issue of Tunica Magazine
Art Direction in Photography • Creative Direction

 

The following project was the result of a collaboration with two photographers we greatly admire for an editorial in the latest Tunica Magazine, designed by Mirko Borsche.  An experimentation in creative direction, this project was inspired by our publication Morena.  Morena delves into the relationship between a photographer and their subject, only this time with a nod to Renaissance era paintings of the Venus. 

 

The final product is the contrast between two very different photographic styles given the same briefing.

 

 

BRIEF

“Dear Julien Pounchou and Kiwi Bravo,

I’d would like to brief you for a self-initiated collaboration. Tunica Magazine has given us 16 pages to fill with whatever content we desire. We decided to use this opportunity to do something we love, and work with people we admire. This briefing will explain the whole project step by step the same way we explained it to ourselves. As a matter of fact, this briefing might be the very beginning of the project, it might also be the end result.

Venus#2
 “Mars and Venus Surprised by Vulcan”  Joachim Wtewael

Our experience with Morena (a 48 page publications exploring the erotic vibes between a photographer and a model) caused us to bring over the concept for Tunica but with a slightly different focus. We will choose eight paintings from the early Italian Renaissance, where instead of the subject being the worship of the Holy Spirit, it will be the worship of human anatomy, particularly the female anatomy. This time period during the Renaissance was the first time artists were experimenting with nudity again after the Dark Ages. Venus, the goddess of beauty love, and sex was often the focus of these paintings. We think Venus is a good metaphor for this project, and therefore she’ll be our protagonist.

Venus#4
“Marte e Venere” Louis Jean François Lagrenée

Eight paintings, each carefully selected based on the Venus’ pose. This is not about re-creating the painting, this is about using the classical pose of Venus to create a recognisable image. The rules are simple. We want you to capture the exact pose, proportion and expression of each Venus using your photographical style.

Julien, we know that you are used to taking pictures of naked women, creating a natural and comfortable atmosphere between you and the model, but you are not used to shooting still lifes. For this project we are going to put you in a little bit of trouble since we want you to shoot the model like an “object”, you have to copy the exactly position of each Venus painting we have chosen.

Venus#8
 “Venus and Cupid with a Satyr” Antonio da Correggio

On the other hand, Kiwi Bravo, we also know that you guys are really used to shooting objects, you usually have a lot of time to prepare and illuminate the set, but you are not used to taking pictures of women, even less so when they are nude.

We are very interested in the tension we are going to create in your pictures changing the way you are used to working. I know that this is a challenge for you guys, though it’s what we are looking for.

What would happen if you set up two very different photographers with the same assignment? How will they interpret the briefing and what would the end result look like? We in the studio are wondering…

Venus#3
“La Fornarina” Raphael

We are very interested in the tension we are going to create in your pictures changing the way you are used to working. I know that this is a challenge for you guys, though it’s what we are looking for.

What would happen if you set up two very different photographers with the same assignment? How will they interpret the briefing and what would the end result look like? We in the studio are wondering…

 

Venus#1

 

“Venus and Cupid” Artemisia Gentileschi

 

You will create a series of eight pictures each based on the same composition. The aim of the project is to show the diversity of two very different photographers, set up with the same assignment. We provide you with context and setting and will ask to make a visual translation of an existing image. Why do we want you to translate an existing image? Because this will give you two an equal starting point which from there, you’re free to move in the way you interpret the briefing. You will only see each other again when you are sharing a spread in Tunica magazine.

Venus#7
“Venus with a Mirror” Titian

 

In the end we’ll expose the photo’s side by side, with both of you making up a spread. On first sight, it has to be clear the photos were inspired by classical paintings, it needs to be obvious both photos have the same composition but it also needs to be a representation of your work. Like painters in the Renaissance, we’re focusing on your specialties. Your individuality as an artist plays a major roll in this project.

You will receive the chosen painting very soon and we are looking forward to seeing how you will approach this.

Good luck and thanks a lot,

Córdova Canillas”

 

 

RESULT OF THE BRIEF

 

tunica 3

tunica 4

tunica 5

Tunica 6

Tunica 7

 

Tunica 01

 

 

Buy it here